worldkit

C470 Interactive Map launched - Worldkit / Drupal integration

My last project at CU last year just launched. It's a showcase project to demonstrate the use of an interactive mapping tool to gather expert and local knowledge about future growth in the region, in this case the ACCEA Project. 

We have constructed a policy-focused model to assess possible cumulative development effects related to the C-470 Corridor project.  The emphasis in this analysis is on the explicit definition of development rules which govern whether or not specific parcels are likely to be built out.  These rules are derived from review of local and regional policies.  Our design relies on readily available spatial data and models as well as interviews or focus group meetings with individuals involved in local development processes.  This interactive website could make the collection of feedback on existing data from developers, local experts and community members easier and more effective­.

We decided to use Worldkit again as the mapping platform. Since this was a project with a quick turnaround time, messing with a custom mapserver application didn't seem worth the time. Worldkit provided a simple mapping solution with a tiled base map for faster loading, zooming and panning and flash overlays. Unfortunately Google Maps integration is not on the development roadmap for Worldkit so future use is somewhat limited if this is a requirement. By integrating Worldkit with Drupal, we gained access to Drupal's great  set of features to quickly build a platform with different access levels, taxonomy, comment features, list building and export features.

Interested to see it live >>

cdot_worldkit_drupal


Mapping a youth friendly city - the 910Arts project

At CU Denver, I recently helped design and implement a mapping application to collect feedback from Denver's youth about what they like and dislike in their neighborhoods. The application wasn't simply a static map often used by car rental companies, like ­car hire shannon­. It was an interactive mapping application that was used to conduct a survey. Children and teenagers were able to add markers to their home or other important places and answered three short questions about the neighborhoods around them. The whole application was built as a kiosk, and participants at the exhibition were able leave their feedback right at the spot.

The big opening was last Friday and I heard back from Darcy Varney, the curator of the exhibition, today: "... it adds a wonderful interactive dimension that has already engaged lots of people and was consistently popular throughout the weekend."

For the mapping part I rediscovered the WorldKit toolkit. One, because of its annotation feature, which is really easy of use and its ability to attach all kinds of input, especially in this case survey questions. The lack of an internet connection was another reason to go with WorldKit as a lightweight mapping solution without having to add something like GeoServer or MapServer to the mix.

Also, as much pain it is to make websites work with Internet Explorer, the kiosk mode is wonderful. If you're looking to adding kiosks as part of your eParticipation projects, you should definitely take a look at this feature

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